Publications

James ‘Son Ford’ Thomas: The Devil and His Blues accompanies the eponymous show at New York University’s 80WSE Gallery, the largest ever devoted to Thomas’ work.

Ronald Lockett (1965–1998) stands out among southern artists in the late twentieth century.

After the death of Martin Luther King Jr., Alabama produced an impressive number of African American self-taught artists whose work particularly focused on the Civil Rights Movement and on aspects of history that led to it.

Creation Story explores parallels and intersections in the works of Dial and his fellow Alabamians, the remarkable quilters of Gee’s Bend.

Thornton Dial (b. 1928), one of the most important artists in the American South, came to prominence in the late 1980s and was celebrated internationally for his large construction pieces and mixed-media paintings.

Celebrating Thorton Dial’s contributions to American art, this book surveys the career of one of our most original contemporary artists, whose epic work tackles the most compelling social and political issues of our time.

This book and exhibition are part of a growing family of research projects about the African American community of Gee’s Bend,Alabama, and its quilts. Surrounded on three sides by a river, Gee’s Bend developed a distinctive local culture and quilt design aesthetic.

Mary Lee Bendolph’s extraordinary patchworks garnered national attention when they were featured among the works of other quiltmakers from her tiny, predominately African American community in the 2002 blockbuster exhibition and book, The Quilts of Gee’s Bend.

Since 2000, Thornton Dial (born 1928) has embarked on one of the most remarkable creative journeys in American visual art. Following his discovery by the art world in the late 1980s, he became in the 1990s a widely known African American vernacular artist.

“Some of the most miraculous works of art America has produced….So eye-poppingly gorgeous that it’s hard to know how to begin to account for them.” –New York Times

 

The women of Gee’s Bend—a small, remote, black community in Alabama—have created hundreds ofquilt masterpieces dating from the early twentieth century to the present. The Quilts of Gee’s Bend tells the story of this town and its art.

This two-CD collection offers a rare audience with the music that has bonded the community and its people .The songs, many of which were unrehearsed, were recorded on church grounds, on porches and in the yards, kitchens and living rooms of the citizens of Gee’s Bend.

Completing the two-volume set, Souls Grown Deep, Vol. 2 takes the visual and historical presentation of the first volume to a richer level, offering an even broader array of artistic styles and media.

The African American culture of the South has produced many of the twentieth century’s most innovative art forms.

Amiri Baraka and Thomas McEvilley

Thornton Dial has been "making things ... just for myself" for much of his life. In 1987 fellow Alabama artist Lonnie Holley heard about Dial's fantastic objects and went to visit him.