News & Events

April 25, 2017

Souls Grown Deep Foundation today announced the next in its series of strategic acquisitions as part of a gift/purchase program designed to strengthen the representation of African American artists from the Southern United States in the collections of leading museums across the country. The High Museum of Art has acquired 54 works from the Foundation, one of the most significant acquisitions by the High’s folk and self-taught art department since its establishment in 1994.

Following major acquisitions by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 2014 and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco earlier this year, these acquisitions draw from the Foundation’s extensive collection of works across media in this genre to promote increased scholarship and understanding of an important and often-overlooked perspective in the narrative of American art history. 

April 25, 2017

The High Museum of Art in Atlanta has the largest collection of Thornton Dial works in the world. It’s now about to get bigger, thanks to a major gift of artworks to the museum from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation.

The acquisition totals 54 works by contemporary African-American artists from the South. Thirteen of those are by Mr. Dial, a self-taught artist who used scavenged materials to depict black struggle in the South. The acquisition includes “Crossing Waters” (2006-2011), which refers to the trans-Atlantic slave trade and was the largest painting ever made by Mr. Dial, who died last year.

With the gift, the museum will also receive 11 quilts by the women of Gee’s Bend, a remote community in Alabama renowned for its beautiful quilting. In a 2002 review in The New York Times of a Gee’s Bend collection at the Whitney Museum, Michael Kimmelman called them “some of the most miraculous works of modern art America has produced.”

February 2, 2017

Souls Grown Deep Foundation today announced the first in a series of strategic acquisitions as part of a gift/purchase program designed to strengthen the representation of African American artists from the Southern United States in the collections of leading museums across the country and internationally.  Following major acquisitions by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in 2014, these acquisitions draw from the Foundation’s extensive collection of works across media in this genre to promote increased scholarship and understanding of an important and often-overlooked perspective in the narrative of American art history.